New recipes

13 Foods That Can Help You Maintain Good Eyesight

13 Foods That Can Help You Maintain Good Eyesight


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

What you eat can affect how well you can see

13 Foods That Can Help You Maintain Good Eyesight

Your vision quality is determined by several different factors, but you may not be aware that your overall health and diet can either help or hurt your eyesight. Even if you are lucky enough to have 20-20 vision, there are certain foods that maintain your eye health.

Açaí

Açaí is loaded with vitamins A and C,” Bennett says. “This antioxidant-rich food protects the retina from free-radical damage.”

Blueberries

“According to a Tufts University study, blueberries may help to reduce your risk of cataracts, glaucoma, heart disease, cancer, and other conditions,” Deviney says. “Eating blueberries regularly improves vision and strengthens blood vessels in the back of the eyes.” Not only do blueberries help your eyes, but they can also improve your skin.

Carrots

Carrots may not eliminate your need for glasses, but they are high in beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin A when absorbed by the body,” Deviney says. “Vitamin A, which is composed of a number of antioxidants, guards the surface of the eye to decrease the risk of ocular infections as well as other infectious illnesses.”

Eggs

Eggs are another example of antioxidant-rich foods that are beneficial to your eyes,” Deviney says. “Eggs also contain lutein and a study showed that compared to leafy greens, the body is able to absorb these antioxidants better from eggs.”

Leafy Greens

Now here’s another reason to eat your green vegetables. “To maintain healthy eyesight, make sure you eat spinach along with other leafy green vegetables, such as kale, Swiss chard, and broccoli,” Deviney says. “These leafy greens are filled with vitamin C, beta carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. It is believed that lutein and zeaxanthin in the macula block blue light from reaching the underlying structures in the retina and reduce the risk of light-induced damage that could lead to macular degeneration (AMD).”

Nuts and Seeds

iStock / Thinkstock

“Vitamins C and E work together to keep healthy tissue strong, but most of us don't get as much vitamin E as we should from food,” says Rene Ficek, registered dietitian and the lead dietitian nutritionist at Seattle Sutton's Healthy Eating. “Have a small handful of sunflower seeds, or use a tablespoon of wheat germ oil in your salad dressing for a big boost. Almonds, pecans, and vegetable oils are also good sources.”

Red Meat

Enjoying steak every once in a while may not be a bad thing after all. “Although it often gets a bad rap, red meat is a great source of the mineral zinc, which is found in the macula of the eye and is also important for immune function,” Bennett says.

Spinach

iStock / Thinkstock

Spinach contains four eye-protecting qualities: vitamin C, beta carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin,” says Mona Bagga, eye surgeon at Assil Eye Institute. “Because they absorb 40 to 90 percent of blue light intensity, spinach is like sunscreen for your eyes.”

Sweet Potatoes

Thinkstock / jcrader

Carrots are not the only orange vegetable that can help your eyes. “Sweet potatoes are rich in beta carotene and antioxidants and they help reduce the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts,” Bagga says.

Tomatoes

Thinkstock

Tomatoes, which are packed full of carotenoids and vitamin A, which can help keep the lens and retina healthy and functioning properly,” says Dave Ardaya, optometrist for the California Optometric Association.

Watercress

Thinkstock / robynmac

“High dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin is linked to lower risk of advanced age-related macular (eye) degeneration, the most common cause of adult blindness,” says Renee Cooper of Live Gourmet. “One cup of raw watercress contains over 1,900 micrograms of lutein and zeaxanthin, suggesting that watercress consumption might help prevent the occurrence of vision-robbing macular degeneration.”

Wild Salmon

Wild caught salmon contains omega-3 fats, which provide structural support to help retinal function,” says Farley. “Salmon contains a powerful antioxidant called astaxanthin, which is especially beneficial to protect again eye diseases.”


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.


Foods to help reduce glaucoma risk

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness among adults. The disease involves an increase in pressure in the eye, which distorts the shape of the eyeball, damaging the lens of the eye, and resulting in blindness. This disease can be mitigated to an extent with eye drops, and cannabis, too, has shown to be of help. Sadly, many people go blind due to glaucoma.

Now a study has shown that eating the right foods may help to reduce the risk of glaucoma, prevent the disease, and help people to maintain healthy eyesight longer in life. Researchers reported their findings in the Archives of the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology.

Doctors have known for some time that too much salt can increase overall blood pressure, leading to increased intra-ocular pressure in the eyes, exacerbating glaucoma. Therefore, moderate salt consumption has been a standard dietary recommendation for those with, or at risk for, glaucoma. But the Spanish study goes further, examining the diets of people in two American ophthalmological studies, and in one study from Rotterdam.

According to these large population studies, intake of foods rich in retinol— a form of vitamin A— helps to reduce the risk of glaucoma. Retinol-rich foods include milk, liver, cheese and butter. Interestingly, there was no evidence that a diet rich in dietary fats has any role in the promotion of glaucoma, even though it is well established that, in general, excessive intake of fats contributes to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Digging deeper, the researchers saw a correlation between lower rates of glaucoma and higher consumption of leafy green vegetables (notably cabbage), carrots, fruits and fruit juices in general, and especially orange-colored fruits such as peaches and apricots.

The Spanish study also recommended high antioxidant foods including green tea, chocolate (the darker and more bitter the better), coffee (skip the sugar and go easy on the cream), and regular black tea. At the same time, they cautioned that those who have well-established cases of glaucoma should consume little or no caffeine, as that can increase intraocular pressure and exacerbate the disease.

To a great extent, the study highlighted the benefits of the usual suspects. Leafy green vegetables and colorful foods are cited for their protective, disease-preventing benefits, due largely to their concentration of beneficial antioxidants. Flavonol-rich foods, notably tea, green tea, coffee and chocolate, offer preventive benefits that extent to glaucoma. And red wine, with its significant antioxidant load, is also recommended.

In the glaucoma study, the researchers provided a seven-point set of guidelines for reducing risk. They are:

1. Consume abundant amounts of colorful fruit and vegetables.
2. Avoid high intake of salt in patients with hypertensive glaucoma.
3. Refrain from high-calorie diets (restricting fat) to avoid an increase in body fat.
4. Consider eating fish or nuts rich in omega-3 PFA, which appear to reduce risk.
5. Avoid drinking large amounts of liquid in a single take. It is preferable to drink small amounts in the course of the day.
6. Consume moderate amounts of red wine, black chocolate and green tea.
7. Avoid coffee and caffeinated beverages into reduce increased blood pressure if you already have glaucoma.

Hundreds of years ago, Hippocrates, regarded as the father of modern medicine, said “Let your food be thy medicine.” Our grandmothers said pretty much the same thing. Now it appears that even with a leading cause of blindness, this advice is sage indeed.