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New York Cheesecake

New York Cheesecake


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leaf: we crush the biscuits in a robot and we pour them in a bowl. Melt the butter over low heat and pour it over the biscuits. Knead until you get a homogeneous dough.

Put the dough in a tart pan with a diameter of 20-25 cm and press the dough with the back of a spoon, or with the bottom of a glass. Cover with plastic wrap and put it in the fridge until we make the filling.

Filling:

Cow's cheese (I used Philadephia because it was in the original recipe, but I think any other cheese works) we beat it with the mixer together with the sugar until it becomes a fine cream.

Dissolve the gelatin in water and mix it with the already made cream cheese, being careful not to boil it.

Separately beat the whipping cream until it hardens. Add sour cream and beat a little more.

Mix the cheese with the whipped cream and sour cream and mix well.

Pour everything over the cookie sheet, level and put in the fridge until it hardens (at least 4 hours)

Topping:

In a saucepan over low heat put a third of the fruit with water and 100 g of sugar, until the sugar melts and a thicker syrup is formed. Set aside and put the rest of the fruit. Stir and refrigerate.

Before serving, pour the cold topping over the cheesecake.


Contents

Modern cheesecake is not usually classified as an actual "cake", despite the name (compare with Boston cream "pie"). People who classify it as a torte point to the presence of many eggs, which are the sole source of leavening, as a key factor. Others find compelling evidence that it is a custard pie, based on the overall structure, with the separate crust, the soft filling, and the absence of flour. [2] Other sources identify it as a flan, or tart. [3]

An ancient form of cheesecake may have been a popular dish in ancient Greece even prior to Romans' adoption of it with the conquest of Greece. [4] The earliest attested mention of a cheesecake is by the Greek physician Aegimus (5th century BCE), who wrote a book on the art of making cheesecakes (πλακουντοποιικόν σύγγραμμα -plate countopoiikon sungramma). [5] The earliest extant cheesecake recipes are found in Cato the Elder's From Agri Culture, which includes recipes for three cakes for religious uses: libum, savillum and afterbirth. [6] [7] [8] Of the three, placenta cake is the most like modern cheesecakes: having a crust that is separately prepared and baked. [9]

A more modern version called a sambocade, made with elderflower and rose water, is found in Form of Cury, an English cookbook from 1390. [10] [11] On this basis, chef Heston Blumenthal has argued that cheesecake is an English invention. [12]

The modern cheesecake

The English name cheesecake has been used only since the 15th century, [13] and the cheesecake did not evolve into its modern form until somewhere around the 18th century. Europeans began removing yeast and adding beaten eggs to the cheesecake instead. With the overpowering yeast flavor gone, the result tasted more like a dessert treat. [14] The early 19th-century cheesecake recipes in A New System of Domestic Cookery by Maria Rundell are made with curd cheese and fresh butter. One version is thickened with blanched almonds, eggs and cream, and the cakes may have included currants, brandy, raisin wine, nutmeg and orange flower water.

Modern commercial American cream cheese was developed in 1872, when William Lawrence, from Chester, New York, while looking for a way to recreate the soft, French cheese Neufchâtel, accidentally came up with a way of making an "unripened cheese" that is heavier and creamier other dairymen came up with similar creations independently. [15]

Modern cheesecake comes in two different types. Along with the baked cheesecake, some cheesecakes are made with uncooked cream cheese on a crumbled cookie or graham cracker base. This type of cheesecake was invented in the United States. [10]

Cheesecakes can be broadly categorized into two basic types: baked and unbaked. Some do not have a crust or base. Cheesecake comes in a variety of styles based on region:

Africa

Asian-style cheesecake flavors include matcha (powdered Japanese green tea), lychee, and mango. Asian-style cheesecakes are also lighter in flavor and are sometimes light and spongy in texture. There is also a higher egg to cream cheese ratio in Asian-style cheesecakes. Compared to its international counterparts, Asian cheesecake is also considerably less sweet.

Australia

Australian cheesecakes are more commonly unbaked. [ citation needed ] Common flavors include passionfruit, chocolate, raspberry, lemon, caramel, and vanilla.

Europe

North America

United States

The United States has several different recipes for cheesecake and this usually depends on the region in which the cake was baked, as well as the cultural background of the person baking it. [23] These cheesecakes are typically baked before serving.


How to Make New York Cheesecake

Before you get started making your cheesecake, you need to make sure that your butter, sour cream, and eggs are at room temperature. Let them sit out for at least an hour before getting started. This is extremely important for the creamiest and best New York style cheesecake.

Step 1: Make the Crust

I like to use a traditional graham cracker crust for my cheesecake. But you could also use a shortbread crust if you prefer.


Mix the graham cracker crumbs with the melted butter and sugar until well combined, then press them into the bottom of the spring form pan and about 1/2 & # 8243 up the sides. Bake the crust until it is set and slightly toasted.

Step 2: Prepare the Filling


Next you want to cream together the softened cream cheese with sugar and flour. The flour is a unique ingredient that isn't in other styles of cheesecakes and it gives the cake a little more structure.

Next you are going to mix in the eggs one at a time until they are all incorporated. The eggs will bind our cheesecake together and create a silky smooth texture.

And last, you are going to mix in the sour cream, the lemon zest, and the vanilla. The sour cream is going to add a bit of tang to the cheesecake along with the lemon zest. The zest is technically optional, but I think it adds the perfect flavor. It won & # 8217t taste like a lemon cheesecake.

Step 3: Bake the Cheesecake


Pour the cheesecake into your pan (you don't need to wait for the crust to cool) and place it on a sheet pan. The batter is going to come almost all the way to the top of your pan.

You & # 8217re going to start the cheesecake at a really high temperature in the oven for a few minutes and then you & # 8217re going to turn the temperature down and let it finish cooking. This high temperature will set the top of the cheesecake and the low temperature will slowly cook it so it stays creamy and the top doesn't crack.

Step 4: Cool the Cheesecake

Perhaps the most difficult part of making this cheesecake is waiting for it to cool! After the baking time is over, you are going to let it cool in the oven with the door shut for about an hour. This will ensure the cheesecake doesn't cool too quickly, further preventing it from cracking.

Then the cheesecake needs to chill in the refrigerator for, at the very least, for 6 hours and preferably over night before taking it out of the pan and slicing it. Allowing it to completely chill is going to give your cheesecake the best flavor and texture!

Step 5: Serve!

I love this cheesecake served plain, but it is also delicious with a fresh strawberry sauce, a hot fudge sauce, or a caramel sauce!

Tips, Tricks, and Techniques

  • It is especially important that your ingredients be at room temperature before making the filling for this cheesecake. This will ensure that the filling is extremely creamy, making the best cheesecake.
  • Be sure to use the paddle attachment, not the whisk attachment, when mixing the cheesecake filling. Cream cheese can start to separate if it is not beaten properly.
  • This filling will fill up a 9 & # 8243 (23 cm) spring form pan right up to the top, making a very tall and rich cheesecake. The process of starting it in a hot oven will ensure it will not overflow.
  • Cheesecake is best made the day before serving due to the long baking and chilling time. Allow it to chill in the refrigerator for 4 hours at the very least before slicing so the filling will be truly set.
  • This classic plain cheesecake with a simple graham cracker crust is truly amazing eaten on its own, or use it as a canvas for fresh berries or top with a chocolate sauce, strawberry sauce, or caramel sauce!
  • If you prefer a sturdier crust, you can use the shortbread crust recipe in place of the graham cracker crust.

Ingredient Functions


Recipe Summary

  • 12 graham crackers
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted plus more, room temperature, for pan
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Pinch of coarse salt
  • 3 1/2 pounds (seven 8-ounce packages) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup sour cream, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 5 large eggs, room temperature

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter the sides of a 10-inch springform pan. Wrap exterior of pan (including base) in a double layer of foil.

To make the crust, process graham crackers in food processor until fine. Combine graham cracker crumbs, butter, sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Transfer mixture to the pan and pat into an even layer using the bottom of a measuring cup or meat pounder. Freeze the dough in the pan, about 15 minutes. Place pan on a baking sheet. Bake until the crust is firm to the touch and deeply golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool completely.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium speed until fluffy, about 3 minutes, scraping down sides as needed.

In a large bowl, whisk together sugar and flour. With mixer on low speed, gradually add sugar mixture to cream cheese mix until smooth. Add sour cream and vanilla mix until smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, beating until just combined do not over mix.

Pour cream cheese filling into the prepared pan. Set pan inside a large, shallow roasting pan. Carefully ladle boiling water into roasting pan to reach halfway up sides of springform pan.

Bake 45 minutes to reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees. Continue baking until cake is set but still slightly wobbly in the center, about 30 minutes more. Turn off oven leave cake in oven with the door slightly ajar, about 1 hour. Transfer pan to a wire rack to let cake cool completely. Refrigerate, uncovered, at least 6 hours or overnight. Before unmolding, run a knife around the edge of the cake.


Recipe Ingredients

For the Crust

  • Graham Cracker Crumbs
  • Salted Butter
  • child

For the Cheesecake

  • Cream Cheese: Bring your cream cheese to room temperature before making your cheesecake so that you don & # 8217t end up with a lumpy filling.
  • child
  • All Purpose Flour
  • Lemon Zest: Gives this cheesecake part of it's signature flavor.
  • Vanilla Extract
  • Heavy Cream
  • Eggs: This cheesecake uses both whole eggs and egg yolks. The extra yolks give the cheesecake some extra flavor, so don't leave them out.


Recipe Summary

  • 12 graham crackers
  • 6 tablespoons butter, melted plus more, room temperature, for pan
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Pinch of coarse salt
  • 3 1/2 pounds (seven 8-ounce packages) cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup sour cream, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 5 large eggs, room temperature

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter the sides of a 10-inch springform pan. Wrap exterior of pan (including base) in a double layer of foil.

To make the crust, process graham crackers in food processor until fine. Combine graham cracker crumbs, butter, sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Transfer mixture to the pan and pat into an even layer using the bottom of a measuring cup or meat pounder. Freeze the dough in the pan, about 15 minutes. Place pan on a baking sheet. Bake until the crust is firm to the touch and deeply golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool completely.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium speed until fluffy, about 3 minutes, scraping down sides as needed.

In a large bowl, whisk together sugar and flour. With mixer on low speed, gradually add sugar mixture to cream cheese mix until smooth. Add sour cream and vanilla mix until smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, beating until just combined do not over mix.

Pour cream cheese filling into the prepared pan. Set pan inside a large, shallow roasting pan. Carefully ladle boiling water into roasting pan to reach halfway up sides of springform pan.

Bake 45 minutes to reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees. Continue baking until cake is set but still slightly wobbly in the center, about 30 minutes more. Turn off oven leave cake in oven with the door slightly ajar, about 1 hour. Transfer pan to a wire rack let cake cool completely. Refrigerate, uncovered, at least 6 hours or overnight. Before unmolding, run a knife around the edge of the cake.


New York Cheesecake Overview

New York Cheesecake is an incredibly creamy and dense style of cheesecake that is somewhat different than other cheesecakes due to the way it is baked and because the recipe includes sour cream in the mixture.

Perfect Cheesecake Without a Water Bath

One of my favorite things about a New York style cheesecake is that it is baked without a water bath, unlike many other cheesecakes. A water bath can be frustrating because it can leak into the pan and cause a messy cheesecake.

New York cheesecake is started in a very hot oven for a short period of time and then finished at a low temperature. This method forms a skin on the top of the cheesecake, setting the top in place which keeps the filling dense and prevents cracking on top even without the water bath!


What you & # 8217ll need to make new york-style cheesecake

Before we get to the recipe, you'll need a nine or ten-inch springform pan and 18-inch heavy-duty aluminum foil. The springform pan features sides that can be removed from the base, so you can release the cheesecake easily without having to flip the whole pan over (this would be a disaster with a cheesecake!).

Springform pans, however, are notorious for leaking. Since a cheesecake bakes in a water bath, the foil prevents the water from seeping in during baking. Please do not attempt to use standard 12-inch aluminum foil & # 8212 you can & # 8217t have any foil seams on the bottom or sides of the pan. I can tell you from experience that no matter how well (or how many times) you wrap the pan, if there are seams exposed to the water, the water will find a way in.

If you’d like to try another technique that doesn’t require wrapping the pan in foil, get more guidance here.